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5 Ways To Help The Homeless During A Heat Emergency

5 Ways To Help The Homeless During A Heat Emergency

When the heat index reaches 95 degrees outside or hotter, the District issues a Heat Alert.

During a Heat Alert, the District’s top advice is to:

  • Stay indoors as much as possible.
  • Turn on the air-conditioner or fan.

This is impossible for many in our homeless community. We’ve talked before about how extreme heat can be just as or more dangerous than extreme cold.

With conditions becoming riskier for people forced to stay outside, we need everyone’s help to look out for our vulnerable neighbors. Here are 5 things you can do to help the homeless during a heat emergency.

 

Know What To Look For Homeless Man Outside

Heat exhaustion and heat stroke are the most serious conditions than can result from overexposure.

The symptoms of heat exhaustion to look out for are: dark colored urine, pale skin, profuse sweating, rapid heartbeat, muscle or abdominal cramps, dizziness, confusion, and fainting.

If left unaddressed, heat exhaustion can lead to heat stroke.

Heat stroke is a medical emergency. Symptoms include throbbing headaches, red, hot, and dry skin, lack of sweating despite the heat, muscle weakness or cramps, rapid heartbeat, rapid, shallow breathing, seizures, and unconsciousness.

 

Don’t Ignore Someone

If you think that someone is having a hard time, ask how they’re doing!

Introduce yourself and ask their name, and see when the last time they had water was. Have a conversation around how their feeling, and see if they are experiencing any of the symptoms above. If they are, show them where to go! DC has lots of options to escape the heat, see the map below for places in your area.

If someone is thirsty, offer water. Staying hydrated is one of the most important things to do in the heat, and you can make a big difference in someone’s day with $1.50 bottle of water.

If you run into someone who looks passed out in the heat, check to see if they’re ok. If they look like they’re sleeping then let them be, but if they’re unresponsive, remember your Red Cross training and call 911 immediately.

 

Who You Gonna’ Call?

If someone needs help getting out of the heat, call the hyperthermia hotline at 1-800-535-7252. The United Planning Organization (UPO) will send a van and can provide water and transport to the nearest cooling station.

In the event of a heat stroke or if a person is unconscious, call 911 immediately.

 

Know Your Options

Like DC says at the top of the page, the best way to avoid suffering from the heat is to stay inside as much as possible. As the map to the right illustrates, there are many resources available for the homeless to take refuge in and escape the heat.

Click on the slider in the upper left of the map to see more options.

Know the resources in your area, and be prepared to direct someone to their nearest cooling shelter, library, spray park, or shelter.

 

Go Beyond The Crisis

At Thrive DC, we are on the front lines helping individuals without homes to have the resources they need to survive their situation, like helping them out water bottles, sunscreen, emergency clothing, hats or bug spray.

Whether or not we have these items depends on the generosity of our donors. You can help us by donating these items either in person or through our Amazon Wishlist.

There are other ways to help out too. Supporting Thrive DC financially helps us have the resources we need to help our clients, and volunteering with us gives our staff the chance to work more closely with our clients. The more people we have helping, the more one-on-one attention we can give.

To learn more about DC’s Heat Emergency Plan, click here.

 

Nathan Fung
Thrive DC Intern

Nathan Fung

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