– laportea Species: Laportea canadensis (L.) Weddell – Canadian woodnettle Subordinate Taxa. I'm not sure if it's the nettle plant or not, but, "First of all, I rubbed the area vigorously as I was annoyed. ", "After washing it with soap and cold water, I could hardly feel that I had been stung. Wood Nettle (Stinging Nettle) Leaf Underside. ", I've been using hot water to treat and clean with, so knowing that I should have been using cold was a huge help with the itch & sting! Flavor More Sting Than Stinging Nettle. ". This page only shows Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica) and Wood Nettle (Laportea canadensis). You can only get stung by the living plant. Then, apply a piece of tape to the affected area and remove it to pull out any remaining fibers from your skin. wood_nettle_young_leaf_ventral_07-02-14.jpg, Wildflowers, Grasses and Other Nonwoody Plants. Clearweed and White Snakeroot do not have hairs on their stems. Clicking or hovering over any of the pictures below will display a larger image; clicking the plant's name will provide information about the plant pictured. The dried leaf is usually taken at a dose of 2 to 4 gm, three times a day; it may be used to prepare a tea by steeping at least 3 tsp. Tiny white dots (cystoliths) containing calcium carbonate crystals appear on stems and leaves. True to its name, stinging nettle imparts a painful sting through tiny hairs on the underside of its leaves and on its stems. ", continuing to pick for 2 hours, I went home and had a hot bath! Stinging nettle is exactly why gardening with gloves is important. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/f\/f6\/Treat-a-Sting-from-a-Stinging-Nettle-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Treat-a-Sting-from-a-Stinging-Nettle-Step-1-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/f\/f6\/Treat-a-Sting-from-a-Stinging-Nettle-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/aid7822-v4-728px-Treat-a-Sting-from-a-Stinging-Nettle-Step-1-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

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\n<\/p><\/div>"}. How long does it take for the rash to stop itching? Young leaves are usually wrinkled and hairy. Try not to scratch the area, as this can cause the irritation to get worse. If you have areas of broken skin that are warm to the touch, draining pus, or more inflamed than the surrounding areas, then you may be developing an infection. However, once it is processed into a supplement, dried, freeze-dried or cooked, stinging nettle … Yes, if the affected area is infected, or the skin underneath is exposed. But like stinging nettle, wood-nettle packs an uncomfortable sting. The stinging hairs, called trichomes, are hollow like hypodermic needles with protective tips. Urticaceae – Nettle family Genus: Laportea Gaudich. Dr. Marusinec is a board certified Pediatrician at the Children's Hospital of Wisconsin, where she is on the Clinical Practice Council. The stinging sensation can last from half an hour to a few days, depending on the sensitivity of your skin. Aside from metal, the container be made from manifold materials like wood, plastic, stoneware, ceramic, glass or clay. Wood Nettle. Plants are generally shorter than stinging nettle, reaching only 4 feet (1.2 m) tall at the most. If the rash is still itching after 24 hours, you might be experiencing an allergic reaction, either to the stinging nettle itself or to one of the treatments. Plants that grow along banks of rivers and streams help prevent erosion. The leaves have hair-like structures that sting and also produce itching, redness and swelling . … Wood nettle, or stinging nettle, often forms dense stands in bottomland forests, streamsides, and other low, wet places. Rating: . Products are available over-the-counter that contain a mixture of anti-infective agents. ", a child I ended up with stinging nettles, they put mud on me from the lake. One of the keys to identification, aside from being in the right habitat, is that wood nettles rise up on a tall slender stalk, and have alternate, somewhat oval leaves. ", "I found this very helpful because before I read the article I was really frightened with pain and discomfort. Leaves are alternate, long petioled, broadly ovate, pointed, coarsely toothed. The nettle’s sting is an adaptation to provide protection from predators. County Office. Another similar species, Boehmeria cylindrica (False Nettle), also has opposite leaves, but it lacks stinging hairs altogether. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. They didn't sting while under the water. Soaking aged tea in a bath with some salts lessens pain. All three plants are in the Nettle Family. We facilitate and provide opportunity for all citizens to use, enjoy, and learn about these resources. Picking young wood nettles is easy – simply cut or break the nettle stalk with bare hands – but as they mature, their sting intensifies, so gloves are definitely called for! Step-by-step instructions stood, "This is the first article I read, used a couple of the methods for my ten-year-old son. Plants are generally shorter than stinging nettle, reaching only 4 feet (1.2 m) tall at the most. For tips from our Medical co-author on how to tell when you should seek medical attention for a nettle sting, read on! Stinging Nettle and Wood Nettle have hairs on their stem, and on their leaves; it's what causes the "sting". You may find, however, a surprise when stripping dried Calamine or Caladryl® lotion can help to provide a soothing feeling and help to reduce the itching and burning. The fine hairs, or trichomes, on the stems and leaves of stinging nettle contain a number of chemicals that are released when the plant contacts the skin. Distinguish from Wood Nettle (Laportea canadensis). This article has been viewed 2,091,211 times. ", "My friend was cleaning my garden and got stung all over her arms and was able to apply some of the remedies. Stinging nettle is an herbaceous plant and often grows to about 2 metres (6.5 feet) in height. West Indian Wood NettleLaportea aestuans. An insect bites you by making a hole in your skin to feed. For tips from our Medical co-author on how to tell when you should seek medical attention for a nettle sting, read on! In this video we talk a bit about Canadian Wood Nettle, a common relative to stinging nettle that many say is a better tasting edible. The leaves and stems of the plant are covered with brittle, hollow, hair-like structures. Symptoms have really, "The article was very useful. Male flowers and female flowers are in separate clusters, both arising in the leaf axils. By using our site, you agree to our. As, "This has happened to me a couple of times in the last few weeks. The actual science behind the use of plants to treat this condition is very limited. A rash that extends beyond the exposed area, and can be all over the body. The toothed leaves are borne oppositely along the stem, and both the stems and leaves are covered with numerous stinging and non-stinging trichomes (plant hairs).